Here Are All the Strict Rules Princess Eugenie's Royal Wedding Guests Will Have to Follow

Absolutely no cameras allowed

Updated 10/11/18

David M. Benett/Getty Images

We can't even begin to fathom how great a privilege it would be to receive an invite to Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank's wedding, the second major royal wedding of the year. You get an IRL view of the bride's gown, you'll catch a glimpse of the Queen, and you get to dress in your Sunday best, fascinator and all. But being a royal wedding guest does have a few drawbacks, believe it or not, if we've learned anything from Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's previous nuptials.

Considering the fact that a public figure will be tying the knot—and with an estimated guest list of 850—obnoxiously tightened security is a given. Not only that, but Eugenie and her fiancé have taken a cue from Harry and Meghan, presenting royal wedding guests with a bit of light reading before the big day. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex gave each wedding attendee a series of "critical guidance" instructions leading up to their May 19 nuptials that ran seven pages long, according to the Daily Mail, and Vanity Fair reports that this trend has repeated itself for guests of Princess Eugenie's ceremony tomorrow.

We broke down the key points of the couple's extensive paperwork for the main do's and don'ts of royal wedding etiquette.

1. Time Your Bathroom Breaks Just Right

Guests seemingly don't have the luxury of using the loo whenever their bladders demanded. According to Vanity Fair, per Brooksbank and Princess Eugenie's instructions, guests will have "limited toilet facilities." Restrooms within St. George's Chapel will be available for use before the ceremony, between 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Looks like the pair's friends may want to reconsider indulging in a pre-ceremony champagne toast.

2. Brace Yourself for Security Checks

Unsurprisingly, all guests attending Eugenie and Brooksbank's royal nuptials will be expected to adhere to a security test at a farm shop in Windsor (likely the same checkpoint used for Harry and Meghan's ceremony). Security measures won't be as intense (or costly) this time around, but guests still need two forms of ID to enter the premises. Following security approval, minibuses will transport wedding attendants to the church, where they'll promptly be seated by 10:15 a.m.

3. Do Come Empty-Handed

This is where royal weddings divulge from standard nuptials (well, one of many differences)—guests were advised not to bring a wedding gift. What's deemed a major wedding faux pas for the rest of us commoners is most likely a security liability for the royal ceremony. Per Vanity Fair, the couple did in fact create a royal wedding registry, but requested that gifts be sent to the bride's father, Prince Andrew's, office in Buckingham Palace.

4. Pack Lightly

All "hand luggage" was forbidden, meaning any massive bucket bags will probably warrant plenty of dirty looks from the police during the security screening.

5. Give Up Your Phones and Cameras

Once guests arrive to the wedding venue, the guidelines state that they'll be asked "to surrender mobile telephones, cameras, and any electronic devices used for image capture," making this a strictly phone-free wedding. The information packet also added that, "photography is not allowed in St George’s Chapel or Windsor Castle." Meghan and Harry enacted a similar no-camera rule for their evening reception at Frogmore House, hence why no Instagram posts from this super secret party ever met the public eye.

6. Absolutely No Social Media

Despite the royal bride's social media savvy, Eugenie has requested that the couple's nearest and dearest refrain from posting any snippets of the big day to social media. Which, you know, is impossible to do without a phone or camera. Royals—always thinking ahead.

Related Stories