The Best Wedding Hashtag Ideas, Plus How to Make Your Own

Get inspired with these #winning wedding hashtags

Updated 08/30/19

Stocksy

Wedding hashtags are a great way to consolidate all those fun Instagram and Facebook pics from the big day into one easily clickable place. To get some inspiration for creating your own, we've rounded up some of the best wedding hashtag ideas from real brides and grooms. Read on for our fave examples, plus five tips from an expert wedding planner on how to create your own!

Top Wedding Hashtags to Get You Inspired

1. #SayYesToTheKress

When Ashley found out her BFF was getting hitched, she instantly knew what the wedding hashtag had to be: a play on the bride-to-be's last name (Kress) combined with everyone's favorite wedding-themed TV show, Say Yes to the Dress.

2. #CrazyStroopedLove

When in doubt, pick a popular rom-com movie title, like the Stroopes did, and make it work! "We got the idea the good old-fashioned way (if you can even say that for a hashtag) by asking close family and friends for recommendations," the bride tells us. "Ultimately, my now-husband's most clever coworker nailed it with this one." This is definitely one of the best wedding hashtags we've heard.

3. #MorganHeBargainedFor

Erika is getting married this spring to her lovely fiancé, David Morgan, and one of her bridesmaids came up with the perfect hashtag for the duo. It's a mix of his last name (soon to be hers) and a reflection of their personalities. He's more of the quiet, thoughtful, calm type, and she's the loud, chatty, and sometimes intense one.

4. #BigFatHarryWedding

When Stephanie found out what her friend's upcoming wedding hashtag was, she couldn't help but laugh. "The groom is named Jason Harris, and everyone calls him Harry as a nickname," she says. "He's been featured in some surf films called Dirty Harry. Because of all of this, they decided that their hashtag would be: #bigfatharrywedding." Hahaha!

5. #2LiveCruzWedding

Prior to the wedding, this bride actually paid someone online to come up with the perfect hashtag, but still, nothing felt right. The closest thing and runner-up was #TheCruzscendo. However, they ultimately went in a different direction: "#2LiveCruzWedding kind of summed it all up for us. We're music fans and maybe a little bit 'out there,' as are our friends, so it seemed appropriate." They did opt out of playing any 2 Live Crew at the wedding though. "Some of our more conservative guests may not have appreciated it," she says.

6. #StocksAndBonds

What happens when a professional writer marries a Stock? A clever hashtag, that's what! "Stocks" is obviously a reference to the two of them, and "Bonds" refers to marriage bonds, which we think is the perfect play on words and oh so fitting.

7. #KellysCupOfJoe

Kelly Donohue was trying to come up with a clever hashtag using her last name alongside her fiancé's, Walsh...and she couldn't think of anything. But then, over breakfast, her sister had a stroke of genius. "My sister and I were having breakfast when brainstorming for a wedding hashtag. Joe's last name is Walsh, and we were having a hard time finding something creative. My sister looked at our mugs and said, 'Kelly's cup of Joe!'"

8. #JRTaleAsOldAsTime

Reynaley Buenaventura's Disney-themed wedding inspired her wedding hashtag. She added her fiancé Josh's initial and her own to personalize the hashtag with a JR at the beginning. Best of all, they chose "Tale as Old as Time" as their first-dance song, pulling it all together.

9. #SealedTheDeal

When Amy married Sean Seal, she immediately knew #SealTheDeal would make the perfect hashtag. After nine years of dating, tying the knot sealed the deal they'd wanted to make for nine years!

How to Make a Wedding Hashtag

"Almost every one of our weddings had a personalized hashtag," says Shannon Gail Clemonds, owner of Shannon Gail Weddings and Events in Chicago. Having trouble coming up with your own? Clemonds shares five tips for creating the best wedding hashtag for yourself and your fiancé.

1. Tap into Your Network of Creative Minds

Online generators will pump out wedding hashtag ideas after you type in your names and wedding date. But it's likely to be generic, like #MrandMrsSmith, etc. Instead, brainstorm with the ones who know you best. "Utilize your own network to get everyone thinking," Clemonds suggests. Start with a Facebook post inviting everyone to share ideas and start a wedding hashtag list. The creativity from your crew just might surprise you.

2. Personalize It

"Personalization is huge," Clemonds says. Start by writing down your and your fiancé's first and last names and your wedding date. Then play around with different words. Clemonds says her biggest tip is to embrace alliteration. "Having that repeat in letters and sounds makes it so much catchier," she says.

3. Make It Memorable

In order for all of the photos to get tagged appropriately, ensure the hashtag is at the tip of guests' fingertips as they're typing their captions. "People will use it if it's really catchy and easy," Clemonds says. For example, a couple that married on July 11 used #ThankHeavenfor711. How's that for easy to remember?

4. Stay Away from Hard-to-Spell Words

Let's say your fiancé has a long, complicated last name. Your side of the family, who isn't as familiar with the name, will likely have trouble spelling it. You'll end up with tons of misspelled hashtags attached to photos you may never see. Instead, Clemonds suggests, "try a different approach by focusing on first names, the date, or even your wedding location."

5. Spread the Word

Coming up with the perfect hashtag is only step one. "If you don't make sure people are aware, then it doesn't filter through as well as you had hoped," Clemonds says. Drive it home by printing your hashtag somewhere your guests will see it—like on the bottom of your ceremony programs or on cocktail napkins at the bar. And once you've settled on your hashtag, don't be afraid to use it. "As soon as you come up with it, you can use it for your own planning, like when you're getting your marriage license or registering," Clemonds says. "You can create a storybook for the whole process."

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