• Pink Lemonade

With the locale of their September 2007 wedding chosen—South Carolina's Kiawah Island—Megan Embrescia and Scott Peckham turned to event coordinator Tara Guérard, of Soirée in Charleston, SC, to bring their creative vision to life. The LA-based couple imagined a dinner party at sunset beneath elegant tenting and chandeliers, in an outdoor setting that would showcase the gorgeous island, where the bride has vacationed since childhood. Mingo Point, an open, lush space on the Kiawah River, was perfect. "It's naturally beautiful with sweeping views of the marsh, draping Spanish moss and great light," says Megan. To achieve the "splendor on the marsh" look they’d pictured, Guérard offset the rustic backdrop with rich fabrics and gorgeous blooms, all in shades of pink and green.

"We wanted to get married with our guests all around us," says Megan. Guérard found the ideal spot in an octagon-shaped brick area where oyster roasts are held. Here, everyone sat in a circle beneath a chic canopy of pink and white chiffon. As a surprise for her Canadian groom, Megan had their string quartet and trumpeter play "O Canada" as he entered. Some guests stood to sing the anthem, too, making the moment even more special. To personalize their day, Megan and Scott wrote their ceremony blending Christian and Native American verses—to celebrate their faith and the Kiawah Indians who originally lived on the island—for the readings and vows. A childhood friend of the bride presided. After the couple were declared husband and wife, a gospel choir led the crowd toward the marsh for cocktails.

Megan and Scott in Kiawah Island, SC

A bride and groom celebrate their rosy future at a colorful outdoor wedding

With the locale of their September 2007 wedding chosen—South Carolina's Kiawah Island—Megan Embrescia and Scott Peckham turned to event coordinator Tara Guérard, of Soirée in Charleston, SC, to bring their creative vision to life. The LA-based couple imagined a dinner party at sunset beneath elegant tenting and chandeliers, in an outdoor setting that would showcase the gorgeous island, where the bride has vacationed since childhood. Mingo Point, an open, lush space on the Kiawah River, was perfect. "It's naturally beautiful with sweeping views of the marsh, draping Spanish moss and great light," says Megan. To achieve the "splendor on the marsh" look they’d pictured, Guérard offset the rustic backdrop with rich fabrics and gorgeous blooms, all in shades of pink and green.

"We wanted to get married with our guests all around us," says Megan. Guérard found the ideal spot in an octagon-shaped brick area where oyster roasts are held. Here, everyone sat in a circle beneath a chic canopy of pink and white chiffon. As a surprise for her Canadian groom, Megan had their string quartet and trumpeter play "O Canada" as he entered. Some guests stood to sing the anthem, too, making the moment even more special. To personalize their day, Megan and Scott wrote their ceremony blending Christian and Native American verses—to celebrate their faith and the Kiawah Indians who originally lived on the island—for the readings and vows. A childhood friend of the bride presided. After the couple were declared husband and wife, a gospel choir led the crowd toward the marsh for cocktails.

Orchids, tough enough to stand up to the intense South Carolina heat, were used at the ceremony to adorn the area where the couple recited their vows. Light and dark pink rose petals also dusted the space.