From the very first day that Anne Parke met David Hines at Unity Church in Dallas, the pair felt a spark. "Our worlds collided," Anne says. But they had a few obstacles to face. Both had been married before and Anne had three sons from a previous marriage. As soon as they began dating, it became clear that David was the man for Anne—and her family. "What told me it was right was that my boys were so comfortable and willing to accept this new person in their lives," she says.

David invited Anne to join him in Austin for a weekend. When she arrived, David brought her to the docks at a local resort. She saw rose petals floating in the water and knew something was up. David had enlisted his mother to help him cover a boat with roses. The boat set out, and at sunset, David produced the ring he and Anne had designed together.

A ceremonial ode to one couple's eternal symmetry

From the very first day that Anne Parke met David Hines at Unity Church in Dallas, the pair felt a spark. "Our worlds collided," Anne says. But they had a few obstacles to face. Both had been married before and Anne had three sons from a previous marriage. As soon as they began dating, it became clear that David was the man for Anne—and her family. "What told me it was right was that my boys were so comfortable and willing to accept this new person in their lives," she says.

David invited Anne to join him in Austin for a weekend. When she arrived, David brought her to the docks at a local resort. She saw rose petals floating in the water and knew something was up. David had enlisted his mother to help him cover a boat with roses. The boat set out, and at sunset, David produced the ring he and Anne had designed together.

Anne found these polka-dot take-out cartons at the Container Store, and used them as gift boxes for the pearl earrings and necklaces that she gave to her attendants. A crafty friend helped add the finishing touch: raffia bows and strands of decorative pom-poms.