Conquer Wedding-Induced Insomnia

Continued (page 3 of 3)

Do legendary sleep-inducers really work?

 

Remedy: Counting sheep

Theory: It’s the insomniac’s cliché—so it must work for somebody!

Pros: The sheer monotony of this tedious numerical task can literally bore you into slumber.

Cons: It has panic potential. Realizing that you’re at sheep number 450 and still not asleep could cause added anxiety.

 

Remedy: Sleeping pills

Theory: That’s what they’re made for.

Pros: Prescriptive tablets (like Ambien) will provide up to seven hours of solid slumber. Over-the-counter (OTC) pills are effective, too.

Cons: Prescriptive drugs can be addictive, which is why most doctors will only prescribe short-term doses; many OTC pills will leave you feeling groggy well into the day.

 

Remedy: Warm milk

Theory: Grandma’s home remedy sounds as comforting as a big hug.

Pros: Like turkey, milk contains tryptophan, a chemical that has been shown to induce mild drowsiness.

Cons: You have to get up and warm the milk. Also, your body quickly gets used to it, so the effective-ness is lost after the first couple of times.

 

Remedy: Scotch

Theory: Alcohol seems to put people out (after the initial high wears off).

Pros: Whether taken on the rocks or straight up with a twist, a shot—or two—of this potent potable is sure to help you fall asleep faster.

Cons: Although alcohol is a depressant and has sedative effects, it will ultimately disrupt the natural sleep/wake cycle and leave you feeling unrested.

 

Remedy: Long bath

Theory: Soaking in a bubble bath relaxes a tense mind and body.

Pros: Raising your body temperature in a tub, then having it drop as you get into bed intensifies a cooling-off process that occurs naturally when you fall asleep.

Cons: It’s labor-intensive. When you’re tired, cranky, and sleep-deprived, do you really want to spend time waiting for a tub to fill?

 

Remedy: Reading

Theory: A big book by your bed at least looks like it would put you to sleep.

Pros: The perusal of poetry, prose, or paragraphs from your favorite bedtime tome can lull you into a relaxed state.

Cons: Reading is inherently a mentally active exercise—your brain is working, so it can’t shut off.

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