Brides DailyDIY

Biggest DIY-Wedding-Music Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

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Photo credit: Jennie Sewell


At BRIDES, we've been seeing a lot of cash-strapped (or just musically picky) couples doing their reception music themselves. Going digital is tempting, but bear in mind that nothing sabotages a party faster than a music malfunction and an empty dance floor. Check out these possible iPod pitfalls and smart solutions.

GLITCH: The gap of silence between songs is deafening in a crowded room.
HOW TO AVOID IT: Despite the common use of the term iPod wedding, it's actually easier to work with iTunes on a laptop than on an actual iPod—the screen is bigger, and you can avoid those uncomfortable silences and tweak equalizer settings to improve sound quality.

GLITCH: Your laptop dies on the day of the wedding, and you can't get to your music.
HOW TO AVOID IT: Always have a backup plan. The easiest is to load your wedding playlists onto your iPod as well. Be sure you have the right cord to connect it to the venue's speakers—and be sure it's fully charged.

GLITCH: Your laptop isn't connecting to the venue's sound system.
HOW TO AVOID IT: Do a dry run: Ask your on-site coordinator what type of cord you need, and plan to bring your laptop to the venue a few weeks before the wedding (perhaps during your final walk-through) to test it out.

GLITCH: Turns out Eminem clears the floor fast.
HOW TO AVOID IT: Think about hiring someone (not a guest!) to be your "music minder" during the reception. She should keep an eye on the crowd's mood and quickly change the playlists (from "cocktail" to "dinner," for example); introduce the person making the first toast; and perhaps make special announcements, like those for the parent dances.

GLITCH: You run out of songs and the party's nowhere near over.
HOW TO AVOID IT: Make each of your playlists 30 to 40 minutes longer than you think you'll need. This way, if your cocktail hour runs long or guests start dancing earlier than expected or stay later, you won't have to frantically download new music as the party rages in the background. (It's happened!)

—Lexi Dwyer, BRIDES magazine

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