What to Do When Guests RSVP, But Are a No-Show at the Wedding


Your wedding day is special for a million reasons. It's the day you solidify your union between you and your fiancé, and it's the day you celebrate that union with your closest friends and family. It's also the day when all of your hard work of dedicated planning and preparation come together into a beautiful ceremony. So there's no wonder why it's extremely frustrating when guests end up not showing up to your nuptials with no prior heads up. So how is a bride to react to a ghosting guest when you've already spent a certain amount per head?

You may have heard about the story that went viral this week pertaining to a certain bride and a hefty $75 bill she charged one of her guests for skipping her wedding. This hot button topic touched hundreds of our BRIDES readers on Facebook and we definitely took notice! So we asked, what would you do if your guests canceled with no advanced notice? Is sending a bill totally acceptable or way over the top? Read real brides' responses below:

"A no call, no show at a wedding is really rude. Everything has a cost, from cake servings to beverages, to place settings to food. So much thought goes into planning and for someone to just not come and not give an explanation is cause for dismissal. I can semi-understand billing the ghost guest, but I would maybe have sent them a note explaining all the charges that went into planning." —Kelly Womack

"The cost of your wedding is not "wasted" money or money spent on other people, its the money you've put forth to celebrate your union. Your guests, when you send them an invitation, are equally entitled to share in that celebration. No matter what the situation is, you should never charge a friend or family member for missing out on the enjoyment of your day." —Karli Zella

"I had two no shows and one was unavoidable, the other just plain ignorant of proper etiquette. I would not bill them for no show, but my opinion of them would definitely change and to me, losing someone's respect means more than money." —Emelia Lily

"Totally rude! It's an invitation, not mandatory attendance! You can give those dishes to someone in the crew instead!" —Cristina Madrid

"I would bill them. It's disrespectful not to show up. If you say you will be there, you make a plan." —Cherise Green

"As the guest I would have offered to pay for the expenses made for us before the bride could send me such an invoice. If I had RSVPd "yes, +1" than I should pay for these expenses. It is then up to the bride to accept or to decline this peace offering!" —Leydi Johana Breuls

"I would never send my guests a bill, but If something came up and I couldn't go last minute, I would still mail the bride and groom their wedding gift as I had already planned on giving it to them. Beyond inconsiderate to RSVP and not mail a gift." —Janeen Kaufman

"I'm a wedding and event planner and I would NEVER advise my clients to bill "no-shows." However, I can understand the urge. Although the unexpected happens, as a guest, it's best to put thought into your RSVP in the first place and really only miss last-minute for an emergency." —Rachel Ortega

"Sometimes things come up and you can't help but miss the wedding last minute. Now with that said, if you don't show up without reason then yes, the couple should be able to send a bill." —Erin Walpole

Want to submit your wedding advice? Follow us on our Facebook page — where you can leave your comments, get fellow brides' tips and advice, and get alerted on up-to-date celeb news!

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